Delectable Beef Stroganoff

I haven’t met anyone yet, who doesn’t like beef stroganoff. Because of the rich creamy base, I always thought it was exclusively a French classic, but the name “stroganoff” didn’t sound French. I was curious about the history of this dish and found a well-written, concise article about stroganoff’s history. You can find the article here. (I am not affiliated with the author, simply wanted to share the information.) In essence, it is indeed a French dish, but the wealthy of Russia would often go back and forth to France, and the Stroganov family of Russia brought back the dish with them, and it became extremely popular in Russia; thus the name of this dish became “stroganoff.” That makes more sense why a French-type dish would have a Russian-sounding name. The article linked in this paragraph gives more detail. A very interesting read!

As most of my readers know by now, I love to prepare the family meals from scratch as often as I can. Beef Stroganoff is one of our favorites, although we don’t have it often. Whenever we do, it’s a real treat! We found some cheap cuts of steak on sale at the store last week. (When we eat steaks, it’s usually ribeye, but have you priced them lately?! It’s a no-go for our household at present.) Instead of savoring this cheap steak meat as an actual steak, I cut off all the fat and set it aside, then cut the meat into small strips/chunks in preparation for the beef stroganoff I planned to make later in the week. That same day I prepped the meat, I rendered all the fat pieces in a pan, and hubby ate the cracklin’ left over and the rendered fat went into a jar for later use. (Can you tell we don’t waste anything?!). Because the “rendered fat” is not part of this recipe, I thought I’d give it a side mention here before getting to the actual recipe… so here goes! Enjoy!

CLASSIC BEEF STROGANOFF

INGREDIENTS:

1 1/2 pounds beef sirloin steak, 1/2 inch thick
8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced (2 1/2 cups)
2 medium onions, thinly sliced
1 garlic clove, finely chopped
1/4 cup butter
1 1/2 cups beef broth (I used my own homemade and home-canned slow-roasted pork bone broth)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups sour cream
3 cups hot cooked egg noodles

DIRECTIONS:

Cut beef across grain into about 1 1/2×1/2-inch strips.

Cook mushrooms, onions and garlic in butter in 10-inch skillet over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until onions are tender; remove from skillet.

Onions, butter and garlic in the pan. You will notice that I did not put in mushrooms at this point, because I used wild foraged honey mushrooms that I had already canned last season, so they didn’t go into the recipe until the end.

Cook beef in same skillet until brown. Stir in 1 cup of the broth, the salt and Worcestershire sauce. Heat to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer 15 minutes.

The cheap cuts of steak going into the pan to sizzle and brown. The smells wafting into the kitchen at this point were amazing!

Stir remaining 1/2 cup broth into flour; stir into beef mixture. Add onion mixture; heat to boiling, stirring constantly. Boil and stir 1 minute.

Stir in sour cream; heat until hot (do not boil). Serve over noodles.

A 16 oz tub of sour cream is 2 cups, so I just “guess-timated” the cup and a half. Turned out fabulous!

Here is the finished result: (after eating our fill, there were plenty of leftovers!)

I do not, nor have I ever, claimed to be a food photographer. HA! This is the portion I put in my paper bowl and I slowly savored every bite!

I hope you enjoyed this recipe! I encourage your to try it for yourself or your family/friends, and see if you haven’t just concocted a huge hit! Enjoy!

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